Be a teacher. Be a better teacher.

Consistent with this mission of Bushnell, the teacher education program is offered in a campus environment that is person and faith oriented. The curriculum is designed to integrate a broad Christian liberal arts academic preparation with research-based education methods and relevant field experiences in a purposeful and explicit fashion. Bushnell’s teacher education program addresses the needs and priorities of elementary and secondary school teachers for today and in the future. The courses and standards have been outlined and approved by Teacher Standards & Practices Commission (TSPC).

Becoming a teacher is a wonderful way to use the gifts that God has given you to inspire young people in life-changing ways. As you study education at Bushnell, you will gain the skills and knowledge you need to become a highly qualified teacher.

Students will learn to implement strong classroom management, best teaching practices, well-crafted lesson plans, and useful assessment tools. You will also develop a strong understanding of the expectations of teachers and students for state standards and benchmarks. All this takes place amid a liberal arts Christian university where your knowledge is broadened, your faith is deepened, and your ethics are grounded.

Completion of this program will result in a recommendation to the Teacher Standards & Practices Commission of Oregon (TSPC) for a preliminary teaching license in education.

Learn about the Pathways in Education program.

A collaborative partnership between Springfield, Eugene and Bethel School Districts and Bushnell University, Pacific University, and University of Oregon working together to transform teacher preparation by designing a single pipeline capable of producing effective, culturally and linguistically diverse teachers.

What does the Pathways in Education program provide?

  • Individualized academic support throughout the program, from application to license
  • Professional development seminars, as available
  • Financial support and information about loans, grants and scholarships (scholarships ranging between $2,500 and $15,000)
  • Workshops/tutoring to boost study skills and test-taking abilities (as offered through the college programs)
  • Career advising – and school year employment opportunities (if not currently employed by one of the partnering school districts)
  • Ongoing mentoring and support

Learn about Pathways in Education

All Concentrations:

PSY 200 General Psychology

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Specific areas studied are history and systems, research methods, perception, human development, personality, learning, memory, emotion,, cognition, psychological disorders, and social behavior.

Elementary Teacher Concentration:

MATH 211/212 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers

The mathematics elementary teachers need to understand. Topics include: problem-solving, sets, numeration systems, whole numbers, algorithms for operations, rational and real numbers, axioms, plane and solid shapes and surfaces, and probability. A two-semester sequence.

Secondary Teacher Concentration:

MATH 105 Introduction to College Mathematics

Survey of applications of mathematics, including logic, set theory, probability, statistics, finance, geometry, and exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to finance, exponential growth and decay using mathematical modeling.

EDUC 302 Foundations of Education & Diversity

This survey course provides an overview of the major laws and principles regarding the historical and contemporary purposes, roles and functions of education in American society as well as an overview of the major concepts, theories and research related to curriculum, instruction and assessment. Effective instructional strategies that ensure active and equitable participation of all learners, as well as modifications for diverse learners with exceptionalities are introduced.

EDUC 322 Classroom Management & Diverse Populations

Classroom management approaches and techniques for elementary, middle and high school students are taught with an emphasis on relational factors that contribute to behavior changes. The logistics of managing transitions and learning spaces, preventative strategies supported by classroom routines and protocols, and problem solving methods are presented. Students review social skills curriculum and approaches to character education. Advisory programs, classroom meetings, and peer mediations are some of the constructs taught as additional supports at the secondary level. Students learn to communicate classroom rules and behavioral expectations that provide a safe and orderly environment for learning, are appropriate to the level of development of students, and are consistent with laws governing student rights and responsibilities. Students develop a “Classroom Management Plan” as a precursor to this work sample component.

EDUC 326 Exceptional Learners

This survey course provides an overview of the major educational practices, theories, and research regarding diverse learners with disabilities. Emergent issues and best practices including Response to Intervention (RTi), differentiated instruction, curricular adaptations and modifications, compliance with laws, ethical concerns, and characteristics and needs of learners with disabilities will be examined. Principles of effective collaborative and interdisciplinary teaming, positive behavior supports, and inclusive educational programming are addressed.

EDUC 415 Faith Integration in Teaching Seminar

Students network each week to share and support each other in the development and implementation of their second (major) work sample. This course also provides the support and encouragement and involves the search of a personal definition of the integration of faith and teaching in a public setting as an integral part of curriculum. Students replicate professional work by designing typical communicative materials expected of first-year teachers.

EDUC 435 Second Authorization Practicum

This school-based practicum takes place in the student’s second age-authorization level and extends classroom instruction through the development of a minor work sample with supervised support. Students will use a variety of research-based educational practices that reflect how students learn and are sensitive to individual differences and diverse cultures.

EDUC 437 EdTPA Support Seminar

This course is designed to assist future teachers to apply the curricular, instructional and assessment strategies learned in previous courses as the student develops and implements their first (minor) work sample. Students learn about the learning needs of special populations in today’s schools including special needs students, talented and gifted learners, and learners who are speakers of other languages. Work sample development will reflect adaptations for students with varying cultural, social and linguistic backgrounds to forward the equitable application of a variety of instructional strategies, assessment methods, and classroom management systems with regard to the demographics of classroom and school communities.

EDUC 495 Senior Field Experience

Starting the school year and continuing in a single classroom, second year students provide small group and whole class instruction and participate in building-level activities, staff development experiences, and parent-teacher conferences. Pre-service teachers work to emphasize instructional techniques that promote critical thinking and problem solving and that encourage divergent, as well as convergent, thinking.

EDUC 496 Student Teaching

This class is a continuation of EDUC 495, Senior Field Experience, including the gradual responsibility for classroom instruction. This culminating experience provides a demonstration of students’ knowledge and skill in the preparation, implementation, and assessment of instruction that includes a positive classroom environment that employs developmentally appropriate practices and the use of technology. Pre-service teachers will monitor the engagement of students in learning activities, and the progress they are making, to determine if the pace or content of instruction needs to be modified to assure that all students accomplish lesson and unit objectives.

Choose a required concentration:

Early Childhood & Elementary Teacher Concentration

  • Child Development and Learning Theory
  • Interdisciplinary Methods
  • Elementary Literacy Methods
  • Math and Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

Middle Level & High School Concentration

  • Secondary Literacy Methods
  • Adolescent Learners & Learning Theory
  • Choose two methods class:
    • Secondary Science Methods
    • Secondary Math Methods
    • Secondary Social Studies Methods
    • Secondary Language Arts Methods

  • Basic Mathematics
  • Advanced Mathematics
  • English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)
  • Integrated Science
  • Language Arts
  • Physical Education
  • Social Studies
  • Spanish
  • Special Education

EDUC 302 Foundations of Education & Diversity

This survey course provides an overview of the major laws and principles regarding the historical and contemporary purposes, roles and functions of education in American society as well as an overview of the major concepts, theories and research related to curriculum, instruction and assessment. Effective instructional strategies that ensure active and equitable participation of all learners, as well as modifications for diverse learners with exceptionalities are introduced.

Choose three courses from the following:

EDUC 322 Classroom Management & Diverse Populations

Classroom management approaches and techniques for elementary, middle and high school students are taught with an emphasis on relational factors that contribute to behavior changes.  The logistics of managing transitions and learning spaces, preventative strategies supported by classroom routines and protocols, and problem solving methods are presented. Students review social skills curriculum and approaches to character education.  Advisory programs, classroom meetings, and peer mediations are some of the constructs taught as additional supports at the secondary level. Students learn to communicate classroom rules and behavioral expectations that provide a safe and orderly environment for learning, are appropriate to the level of development of students, and are consistent with laws governing student rights and responsibilities.  Students develop a “Classroom Management Plan” as a precursor to this work sample component.

EDUC 326 Exceptional Learners

This survey course provides an overview of the major educational practices, theories, and research regarding diverse learners with disabilities. Emergent issues and best practices including Response to Intervention (RTi), differentiated instruction, curricular adaptations and modifications, compliance with laws, ethical concerns, and characteristics and needs of learners with disabilities will be examined. Principles of effective collaborative and interdisciplinary teaming, positive behavior supports, and inclusive educational programming are addressed.

EDUC 331 Child Development & Learning Theory

This course is designed to introduce students to developmental perspectives of elementary age and early adolescent children and the learning theories as they apply to different ages.  Personal, social, moral, and cognitive aspects of development are explored.  The study of learning theories includes behavioral, social, and cognitive approaches.  The implications of developmental theories are explored including impacts on interests, motivation, and achievement with emphasis given to the role of the family, socialization, and the supportive influence of teachers and schools, including the needs of at-risk and exceptional learners.  As students apply concepts from the class, they are encouraged to consider cultural and individual differences in development and learning styles.

EDUC 371 Adolescent Learners & Learning Theory

This course is designed to introduce students to developmental perspectives of middle and high school age children and the learning theories as they apply to different ages.  Personal, social, moral, cultural, and cognitive aspects of development are explored.  The implications of developmental theories are explored including impacts on interests, motivation, and achievement with emphasis given to the role of the family, socialization, and the supportive influence of teachers and schools, including the needs of at-risk and exceptional learners.

Any English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Course

**An academic advisor will assist you in mapping out a graduation plan

Teacher Education Application Process

Teacher Education Application

Students who have completed approximately 60-semester credits and are ready to begin major classes are required to apply for admission into the Teacher Education program. Please make sure you complete the following steps as you prepare your application to the Teacher Education Program of Bushnell University:


Step 1: Admission to Bushnell 
University

Step 2: Application to School of Education (once admitted to university)

  • Teacher Education Application
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Two disposition assessments (must be completed by someone outside of the Bushnell School of Education)
  • Autobiography (500-1000 words in length)
    • An original autobiography must explain how your life experiences have contributed to an interest in teaching as an academic and professional career. The autobiography should also demonstrate proficient writing skills while reflecting a rich portrait of your background interests and aspirations.

Step 3: Class Standing

  • Hold a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 as determined by the Bushnell Registrar.
  • Transfer with an earned Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer (AAOT), or an approved equivalent, documented with complete, official transcripts.
  • Show successful completion of prerequisites:
    • MATH 211/212 Math for Elementary Teachers (For students wanting to teach elementary grades)
    • MATH 105 College Mathematics (for students wanting to teach secondary grades)
    • PSY 200 General Psychology
    • Any science w/lab
    • Any communication course

Step 4: Personal Interview

  • Candidates who have satisfied Steps 1 – 3 are eligible for an interview.
  • Personnel from the Teacher Education Department will contact candidates to schedule a 30-minute individual interview with the Teacher Education Faculty.
  • Candidates will also complete a 30-minute on-site writing sample following the interview.

Step 5: Fingerprinting (as required by law)